Category Archives: Environment

Dawei Village to Sue Over Tin Mine Pollution

Residents of Myaung Pyo village in Tanintharyi Region have filed a lawsuit against a Thai Corporation and the Ministry of Mines, demanding compensation for damages caused by the nearby Heinda mining project.

Residents of Myaung Pyo village in Tanintharyi Region have filed a lawsuit against a Thai Corporation and the Ministry of Mines, demanding compensation for damages caused by the nearby Heinda mining project.

The Burmese authorities have warned the Heinda mining company, operating east of Tavoy, in southern Burma to improve and contain their work practices, that have destroyed villager’splantations, or their mining operation would be stopped.

Poppy Plantations Destroyed to Prevent Opium Production

Myanmar, Southeast Asia’s largest opium-poppy growing country, has destroyed a total of 12,774 hectares of poppy plantations, 20 percent of the total of 507,800 hectares, across the country.

In October 2013, the authorities spoiled 5,019 hectares of poppy plantations in Shan and Kayah states. The Shan State remains the center of Myanmar’s opium producing area, accounting for 90 percent of opium poppy cultivation.

To curb such illicit activities, the government has extended its 15-year drug elimination plan (1999-2014) to 2019 and has also implemented alternative development projects in the areas of poppy cul t iva t ion in collaboration with the United Nations Office for Drug and Crime (UNODC) and the governments of Thailand and China.

Environmental Impact: A Top Concern for Myanmar’s Gas Pipelines

THE PROJECT BETWEEN CHINA NATIONAL PETROLEUM AND MYANMAR OIL & GAS ENTERPRISE
THE PROJECT BETWEEN CHINA NATIONAL PETROLEUM AND MYANMAR OIL & GAS ENTERPRISE

Environmental protection is a top concern in the construction of the natural gas pipeline in Myanmar.

Myanmar-China pipeline spans central Myanmar, with unloading points at Kyaukphyu in Rakhine state, Yenanchaung in Magway and Thaungtha in Mandalay. Myanmar will receive 2.5 billion cubic metres of natural gas a year from the pipeline.

The major cause of worry of a possible leak in the pipeline has been put to rest, with energy officials, having preinstalled supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Since its inception, the construction process and the environmental protection measures have been developed in strict compliance with international standards, owing to the inflow of foreign investment.

An in-depth look into a number of factors such as geology, climate, air, noise, water quality, hydrology, animals and plants will be provided by the environmental impact assessment (EIA) report.

EIA also identifies feasible solutions for mitigating or preventing the potential effects of the proposed projects on the environment.

The Myanmar-China Pipeline Watch Committee is continuing to press the issue of compensation, for land acquired by the pipeline operators. The committee comprises of 25 civil society groups active in 21 townships. So far, there has been no environmental pollution or ecological damage accident.